Grognardia

This campaign was started thanks in large part to a blog post at Grognardia. The key part of the post is copied below and served to focus my mind whilst this campaign first began taking shape in my fevered brain. The decision to use Burning Wheel for this campaign stemmed from a long-enduring itch that simply needed to be scratched. Our group had played some one-shots of BW and we all felt that there was a true gem of a game waiting to be discovered through prolonged play. I decided that I didn't want to make BW fit into a published campaign world and so I took the opportunity to finally have a crack at creating a fantasy setting, with the help and input of the players.

It's also hard to stress the importance of the Fighting Fantasy books were in introducing me to what nowadays we simply call "British fantasy." Back then, especially to someone living on the other side of the Atlantic, there was no such blanket term for the dark, moody, sometimes grubby, often surreal lovechild of Moorcock and Tolkien by way of 2000 A.D. comics that I first encountered through the pages of Fighting Fantasy. My encounter with it came at just the right time too, providing a much-needed antidote to the antiseptic, mass market-friendly art of Larry Elmore and his imitators that was increasingly coming to be the face of American fantasy gaming. I fell both in love and in fear with artists like Nicholson, Ian Miller, John Blanche, and others who presented me with a totally different take on fantasy than the bland, family-friendly stuff that TSR was serving up. Theirs was a decidedly dangerous world; it was gloomy and monster-filled and venturing too far off any road was a sure way to get yourself killed. There was a creepy, "dark fairy tale" quality to the art — perhaps "dreamlike" or "nightmarish" might be better terms. You were quite clearly in a world of fantasy, not just the Real World-with-Elves, and that had a powerful effect on me as a teenager.

 

Back

Grognardia

Nightfall Fingolfin Fingolfin